Lucy Raverat—WHEN IS NOW. Francis Kyle Gallery 9 July – 14 August, 2014 Francis Kyle Gallery—Artists

Yellow Squares. Mixed media on canvas, 40 X 32 cm

Time Warp. Mixed media on canvas, 50 X 50 cm

Corto's Bonfire. Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm

Yellow Mountain. Mixed media on canvas, 70 X 70 cm

Queen of the Forest. Mixed media on canvas, 110 X 100 cm

Morning Glory. Mixed media on canvas, 60 X 60 cm

One Morning In May. Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm

Spring Flower. Mixed media on canvas, 50 X 50 cm

Waiting For The Day. Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm

Cornucopia. Mixed media on canvas, 60 X 60 cm

Lady In Red Prospect Park. Mixed media on canvas, 90 X 130 cm

When Is Now. Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm

Evening Ball Game. Mixed media on canvas, 65 X 95 cm

Out Of Nowhere. Mixed media on canvas, 75 X 58 cm

Flight From The City. Mixed media on canvas, 96 X 129 cm

Smoke In The Vines. Mixed media on canvas, 100 X 100 cm

Passing Clouds. Mixed media on canvas, 110 X 110 cm

WORK

Yellow Squares
Mixed media on canvas, 40 X 32 cm
Time Warp
Mixed media on canvas, 50 X 50 cm
Corto's Bonfire
Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm
Yellow Mountain
Mixed media on canvas, 70 X 70 cm
Queen of the Forest
Mixed media on canvas, 110 X 100 cm
Morning Glory
Mixed media on canvas, 60 X 60 cm
One Morning In May
Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm
Spring Flower
Mixed media on canvas, 50 X 50 cm
Waiting For The Day
Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm
Cornucopia
Mixed media on canvas, 60 X 60 cm
Lady In Red Prospect Park
Mixed media on canvas, 90 X 130 cm
When Is Now
Mixed media on canvas, 64 X 90 cm
Evening Ball Game
Mixed media on canvas, 65 X 95 cm
Out Of Nowhere
Mixed media on canvas, 75 X 58 cm
Flight From The City
Mixed media on canvas, 96 X 129 cm
Smoke In The Vines
Mixed media on canvas, 100 X 100 cm
Passing Clouds
Mixed media on canvas, 110 X 110 cm
Heart Of Gold
Mixed media on canvas, 110 X 110 cm
Deep Drop
Mixed media on canvas, 250 X 220 cm
Mind the Gap
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
What's the Point
Mixed media on canvas, 180 X 180 cm
River City
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
Behind the Times
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
Inside Out
Mixed media on canvas, 160 X 160 cm
Woosh
Mixed media on canvas, 250 X 200 cm
Out of the Box
Mixed media on canvas, 120 X 120 cm
New Shoots
Mixed media on canvas, 120 X 180 cm
Brooklyn Dreaming
Mixed media on canvas, 120 X 160 cm
Yellow Woman
Mixed media on canvas, 60 X 60 cm
Follow My Leader
Mixed media on canvas, 70 X 70 cm
November Forest
Mixed media on canvas, 81 X 81 cm
Night River
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
Babylon
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
Night River
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
Return
Mixed media on canvas, 180 X 200 cm
Standing Alone
Mixed media on canvas, 130 X 190 cm
Treasure Island
Mixed media on canvas, 200 X 200 cm
Cherry Orchard
Mixed media on canvas, 100 X 100 cm
Haute Pyrenées
Mixed media on canvas, 90 X 120 cm
Rain in the Valley
Mixed media on canvas, 130 X 90 cm
Sonoma Sunrise
Mixed media on canvas, 81 X 54 cm
The House at Paraza
Mixed media on canvas, 60 x 80 cm
Tomorrow
Mixed media on canvas, 130 X 97 cm
Zero Summer
Mixed media on canvas, 90 X 120 cm
Waiting Room
Mixed media on canvas, 35 X 45 cm
Afternoon at Emily's
Mixed media on canvas, 50 X 35 cm
Catherine at Vinales
Mixed media on canvas, 60 X 80 cm
Fire in the Mountain
Mixed media on canvas, 100 X 120 cm
Jacaranda Tree
Mixed media on canvas, 100 X 120 cm
The Picnic
Mixed media on canvas, 100 X 120 cm
Waiting for Gustav
Mixed media on canvas, 50 X 120 cm

WORDS


I was born in 1948 into an artistic family. My French grandfather lived and worked in Provence, my grandmother was a well-known wood engraver, and my mother and two sisters also paint. So for me it was the natural thing to do and it has always been part of my life. I remember from an early age the intoxicating smell of turps, and the atmosphere of an artist’s studio, and even then I could see that she inhabited a world of her own which encouraged me to create mine. It soon became the underlying reality in my life, and the thread that I return to in any situation, it seemed the obvious choice to go to art college and at 18 I managed to scrape together the “O” levels necessary to do a pre-diploma year at Hornsey Art College which I found confusing and demoralising, so when I was rejected for the painting degree, I was almost relieved.

After that I went to India, fell in love and came back to live in a small isolated cottage in the moors near Lancaster and had 2 babies. To remain sane I took up painting again but for my own pleasure this time. Away from the pressures of tutors and other students I started to develop a style that was mine and by the time all 4 kids were going to school I was ready to start painting full-time. I met Richard Di Marco in Edinburgh and he introduced me to a gallery in London and I continued showing paintings in London for the next 15 years.
When we moved to France in the early nineties I realised that the style that I had evolved was becoming cliched. Instead of taking an image in my head and then finding a way to put it down in paint, I wanted to discover the image that is hiding somewhere in the canvas and allow the paint to show me the direction..

My inspiration has always come from my own life, the little everyday situations and the predicament of human existence in a strange and beautiful universe. My influences range from early Italian painters (Giotto, Fra Angelico, Botticelli) to Turner, Poussin, Bonnard, Vuillard, the Japanese artists of the floating world; and more recently Jackson Pollock and the contemporary Chinese artist, Zao Wouki, and the photographer, Francesca Woodman.

For me a painting is successful when I am pulled into it and have the feeling that it’s the painting that is looking at me, at once the observer and the observed. After 1998, my painting became a lot less figurative, while still using techniques that I evolved in the last 25 years: building up and rubbing away layers of paint, allowing the painting to indicate where it’s going and then finding out where that is. Since 2010,the work has become even more abstract and much bigger (200 x 200) and is about finding the point at which any quality transmutes into its opposite, inside/outside, empty/full, light/dark, easy/difficult, big/little and far/near.

Hz divider

Sur
—Indian Poem—
When Sur comes into existence,
it unfolds
a uniquely constructed form
in the design of nature,
with its own space in
the grand harmony.

It creates a flame
of an ever-increasing brightness
and a definite structure
of consonance.

In our effort to understand Sur,
we rush
to assign meaning to it.
We translate,
interpret,
convert
this contentment
that we receive from the Sur
into a meaning relevant in our world.
(The world of words, for instance, Ras, Bhav.)

We draw a curtain across this fierce light
only to dilute its essence
so it becomes easier for us to see.
Without realizing that it
cannot be named,
we give it the attributes joy, sadness, yearning...

But,
to have the courage
to stand before the Sur
and witness its creation and fire thereafter,
to accept
its intensely beautiful bareness,
to allow
the experience to be its own self
without
our participation or interference,
this is the task.

We know
it's power and truth are what
we are unable to stand and watch.
Its radiance is clearly too radiant.

And, in the general playfulness of nature,
every pure note
that comes into being
also creates a field of Maya around it.
Like the disc of the sun
throws beams of light 360 degrees outward
so that the eye is unable to comprehend
through its fog of light,
the actual figure of the sun itself.

And yet,
to stand by Sur,
this is real Sadhana.

To stand still,
and wait in this brightness,
though it may be too sharp to bear.
To watch slowly,
the intensity of the Sur give way
for our mind
to comprehend its form
across the glare of Maya.

To offer this strength,
and to be allowed
into its fold...
This is
to be in
the presence of the Almighty.
—anonymous

This poem is about the original sound , but perfectly expresses the way I feel about painting.— Lucy Raverat
Hz divider

PRESS


Lucy Raverat On Her Joyce-Inspired Art
By Lesley Thulin | August 15, 2013
image
Good Morning James
Although James Joyce's novels have been noted for their musicality and practically beg to be read aloud (think the sirens episode in “Ulysses,” or really any portion of tongue-twister “Finnegans Wake”), a new exhibit at the Francis Kyle Gallery showcases visual interpretations of the Modernist master's literature.

“Jumping for Joyce: Contemporary painters revel in the world of James Joyce,” which runs until Sept. 25, includes he work of more than 20 artists. Since the exhibit features an overwhelming number of paintings inspired by “Ulysses.” I was intrigued by the only one that, as far as I could tell, braved an interpretation of “Finnegan’s Wake”— Joyce’s elusive final novel that has inspired scholars to pen their own skeleton keys.

I talked with the artist, Lucy Raverat, about her three contributions to the exhibit and how consciousness “doesn't give a s--t” about plot in “Finnegan’s Wake.” Hz divider Lesley Thulin (LT) Can you tell me about the process of painting “riverrun,” “Molly Bloom’s dilemma,” and “Good morning, James”.
Lucy Raverat (LR) I’m not actually a very literary person — I mean, I do read. I kind of dipped into it, but I didn't read “Ulysses.” from beginning to end. I could quickly see that the way Joyce writes is, he just kind of mixes everything up into a great big soup. He takes ideas from everywhere and mixes it all up. He takes ideas from all kinds of different times, so time doesn’t really start in one place and go through, continuously. He takes everything all at once.
So, for my style of painting, that seemed to suit me very well, because I don’t like to take an idea and put it into my mind and then illustrate. That’s not the way I work. So the way I work is to simply… I just paint and see what happens.
image
Molly Bloom's Dilemma
LT What do you see as Molly Bloom’s dilemma?
LR That’s more or less from her soliloquy at the end of the book. There’s a bit where she’s lying in bed and just all these different things are coming into her head, drifting through, and she is talking about her life in a very free and easy way. Things that are important to her are all mixed up with completely small things — just things that are happening in her day — and the painting I did was really about that. It’s about the strange little pathways that everybody’s life is taking. It seems to be going from A to B, but these pathways are very random and can be going from anywhere to anywhere.
LRAnd so for Molly’s dilemma, it’s just about these odd trains of thought that seem to travel that seem to shut her up in different directions and crossover and mix up. Some are beautiful and some aren’t. It’s really just about the randomness of a mind, really... of all the circumstances that come together that get that human being to be that human being.
LT Could you tell me about “ Good morning, James” ?
LR It’s the most figurative of the paintings that I put in there. His [Francis’] gallery is quite a figurative gallery. So, I just took the feeling of Dublin, which, if you notice in that painting, there’s a skylight above the door. In Dublin, a lot of the doors have that sort of Georgian feature. It’s just imagining James and his life in Dublin, getting up in the morning and then he’s going to write his book. He’s tapping into this kind of great sea of thoughts.
LT I’d also like to ask you about “ Finnegan’s Wake.” The book is notoriously difficult.
LR Yeah.
LT Did you read it in its entirety?
LR I have read it. I didn’t read it this time, but I have, a long, long time ago. But I just dipped into it this time and remembered. That’s where “riverrun” comes from, actually.
image
Riverrun
LT Right.
LR In fact, he spelled it wrong. It should be spelled with a small “R” and it should all be one word. So the idea in that is loosely connected to something that’s got nothing to do with James Joyce. We were just recently in India for the Kumbh Mela. You know what the Kumbh Mela is?
LT Is that when millions of people bathe in the Ganges?
LR Yeah. It’s a huge, huge meeting. It’s the biggest meeting of human beings on the planet. It’s like 15 million people come together at a certain time to bathe in the Ganges in this month which is auspicious. We went to see that. I was still, at the time, thinking about the Joyce show, and it occurred to me that “Finnegan’s Wake” and the Ganges — there’s a lot going on. The way that Joyce treats his writing, and “Finnegan’s Wake”, in particular, and he treats the Liffey— the river that runs through Dublin— you could connect it with the Ganges. The Ganges has a physical aspect, but in Indian spirituality, has another thing… The place where the Kumbh Mela happens is actually the meeting of three rivers. And one of them is the invisible river— the Sarasvati. So the most auspicious place to bathe is this place where the invisible river rises. And that is because this meeting of rivers symbolizes in each human being the place where our humanness can come into touch with something much more universal, which is what I think James Joyce is doing in “Finnegan’s Wake”. He’s using the Liffey in the same way as the Ganges is represented in Indian thought.
LT Is that why you decided to focus on that one word, “riverrun”?
LR I find that that’s what the whole book is all about. All of the stuff that a life contains, which is all of the thoughts, all of the people, all of the actions, everything that goes up to make a life actually is flowing into this river which is a river of consciousness, you could say.
LT Some people say that “Finnegan’s Wake” lacks a plot. What's your take on this?
LR I think that it is completely without a plan, and that plans are human-made things, and consciousness doesn’t give a s–t about plans. Plans have got nothing to do with life. Plans happen within life, not the other way around. So, in that way, I think James Joyce is right. It’s all completely random and you can't get a hold of it, either. It’s just escaping in all directions. And to try to keep it going in all direction is a bit of a human mistake.

Hz divider


Artist Lucy Raverat
Interview by Sophie Reynolds
I always made art. It was a normal thing to do in my family. I found out when I was quite young that this was a place where I could be at ease. The first paintings I remember were by Rousseau and Picasso. I was about eight. They kind of gave me permission to do what I wanted.
I remember deciding that I was going to follow this impulse to paint and that I would dedicate all the time, materials and space that it needed. Later it became my refuge from the demands of family life and grew from there into a way of being in the world and being a “proper”person with a “career”. The process continues as I go deeper into exploring what pleases me. That this this somehow pleases others as well, tant mieux!
image
Standing Alone
I think painting has always been an essential part of my way of understanding about what is going on and what I am doing here. I feel really lucky to have discovered this so young. It’s a way going into the unknown, unarmed and naked, with no idea where to put my foot; I can’t even see the ground. Yet somehow, as I take that step forward, magically the ground appears and in that way I advance. It’s like I have no idea what I’m looking for, but I know when I find it.
Before I begin a painting there is a void I find myself in that is totally scary. It’s the beginning that’s the most difficult. I kind of create accidents to start with and hope for the best until the painting begins to direct itself, then I just follow…
Sometimes a painting practically does itself and sometimes I have to really work at it…doing, undoing and doing again. As long as I’m clear about the vibration it produces I don’t mind. In fact this process has become quite an essential part of the end product as I often destroy a work and start again with more layers, and then destroy again. Its really about remaining true to this invisible something. I use paint stripper, sand paper… and I play with them a lot.
image
Night River, 2011
What I like about this process of destruction is that it depersonalizes the work. Just as age is a grey leveler –everyone is equal before age– so all paintings are equal once destroyed, so what comes through from the remainder has a certain distilled quality and purity which is its essence, because all that had been constructed around it has been destroyed. We spend so long constructing ourselves and our characters, until we think, “God! I can’t get rid of this!” But if we go through this destruction process we discover we don’t need all the layers of our constructed selves. This is linked to the art of Zen brush painting, where just one stroke communicates the whole. It takes years to get there, but that is what all the years of work are about— the getting to the place where you personality no longer dictates what you do. Art, for me, is making visible the invisible. I hope that the more I’m able to find that place for myself the more it will enable others to go there for themselves, which is why I want to paint abstract now. maybe it is because with age one is less concerned with outer visible forms as the inner, invisible world becomes more and more beguiling. It’s important for me to keep it as light as I can.

Hz divider

EXHIBITIONS


2014

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. (solo show)

2013

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. Jumping for Joyce (mixed show)

2012

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. (solo show)

2011

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. (mixed show)

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. (solo show)

2010

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. (solo show)

2009

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, (solo show)
Francis Kyle Gallery, London, Russia (mixed show)

2008

Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK. (solo show)

2007

Everyone Sang [mixed show]
Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK.

2006

Francis Kyle Gallery, London (solo show in September), UK.
Casa Guayasamin, Havana [solo show - part of the Biennale]

2005

The Lair of the Leopard (mixed show)
Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK.

2004

Miami Art Fair (with Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK.

2003

Roma (mixed show), Francis Kyle Gallery, London, UK.
Francis Kyle Gallery, London (solo show), UK.

2002

Artbank Gallery, London, UK.

2001

Artbank Gallery, London, UK.

2000

Artbank Gallery, London, UK.

1999

Art ’99, London, UK, with England & Co
Waterman Fine Art, London, UK
Maison des Arts, Bédarieux, Hérault, France (solo show)

1998

Bartley Drey Gallery, London, UK (solo show)

1997

Maison des Arts, Bages, Aude, France (solo show)

1996

The Gallery at Lots Road, Chelsea (solo show)

1995

--

1994

Stephen Bartley Gallery, Chelsea (solo show)
Galerie l’Etang d’Art, Bages, Aude, France

1993

Peter Scott Gallery, Lancaster University
Broughton House Gallery, Cambridge (solo show)

1992

Yorkshire Television Building, Leeds (solo show)

1991

Boundary Gallery, London, UK.
Roy Miles Gallery,London, UK.

1990

The Art Company, Leeds (part of the Leeds Festival)

1989

Art ’89, London
The Art Company, Leeds
Bowmoore Gallery, London (part of Women in Art exhibition)

1988

Grabowski Gallery, London, UK (solo show)
Boundary Gallery, London, UK

1987

Beaux Arts, Bath (solo show)

1986

RONA exhibition touring southwest France

1985

Barbican Centre, London, UK (RONA exhibition)

1984

Richard de Marco Gallery, Edinburgh
Barbican Centre, London (RONA exhibition)
Royal Festival Hall (RONA exhibition)

1983

Crane Arts, Chelsea

1982

Portal Gallery, Bond Street
Crane Arts, Chelsea

1981

Crane Arts, Chelsea

1980

Duke’s Playhouse, Lancaster (solo show)

CONTACT


Lucy Raverat



La Voulte

34390 Mons la Trivalle

France

spacer

tel: 04.67.97.82.73

International: 0033467978273

Email: